SR-22 Insurance FAQs

Have some questions about SR-22 insurance? In these FAQs, we’ll answer all of them, telling you everything you need about SR-22 filings and how you can get the most out of them.

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What is an SR-22?

SR-22 is a vehicle liability insurance document that’s often required by the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) if you have been convicted of a driving charge, such as a DUI.

There are a few misconceptions concerning the SR-22. Firstly, SR-22 is not an insurance policy and there is no such thing as SR-22 car insurance. It’s merely a form filed by your insurer on your behalf. Often filed electronically, this form shows the relevant authorities that you have the required insurance needed according to your state minimum requirements.

What’s more, the SR-22 won’t increase your car insurance rates directly; it’s the conviction leading to an SR-22 that causes those premiums to climb.

How Can I Get an SR-22 Form?

You need to purchase car insurance coverage to get an SR-22, there is no other way. The state minimum limits must be purchased. These limits differ from state to state, but nearly always include a minimum amount of property damage cover and bodily injury cover, with some states also requiring personal protection injury, medical payment insurance, and uninsured motorist cover.

Why Do I Need an SR-22 Form?

You won’t always be required to file an SR-22 as some states don’t have this requirement. In states where an SR-22 is mandatory, it provides proof of financial responsibility and could be required in the event that you:

  • Do not have any liability insurance on your policy
  • Have a moving violation such as reckless driving
  • Have a serious violation such as a DWI or a DUI
  • Have a lot of DMV points
  • Are reinstating your license after it has been suspended
  • Have been convicted of driving without car insurance

What is the Difference Between an SR-22 and FR-44?

An FR-44 is very similar to an SR-22, but it is only required in the states of Virginia and Florida, and typically only when the driver has been convicted of serious offenses such as DUIs.

In these states, the FR-44 must be maintained for a period of 3 years and the liability limits are typically much higher than the state minimum.

How Long do I Need it for?

You may need the SR-22 for anywhere from 1 to 5 years, with the average being 3. However, this ranges from state to state.

How Much Does Auto Insurance Cost with an SR-22?

An SR-22 insurance policy may cost more than the state average, and, in some states, it can cost a lot more.

The key here is not the SR22 itself, but the reason it is required. For instance, if it’s necessary because of a serious offense that resulted in a reinstatement, then that offense may lead to a sharp increase in the cost of insurance. You will also be expected to pay a filing fee.

The insurance carrier still plays a role, as does the amount of cover that you purchase and the car insurance company you go with, but you can find the average SR-22 costs below:

  • Alabama – Average Rate = $1,300; Average Rate with SR-22 = $1,950
  • Alaska – Average Rate = $1,200; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,500
  • Arizona – Average Rate = $1,450; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,740
  • Arkansas – Average Rate = $1,550; Average Rate with SR-22 = $3,580
  • California – Average Rate = $1,850; Average Rate with SR-22 = $5,120
  • Colorado – Average Rate = $1,780; Average Rate with SR-22 = $3,000
  • Connecticut – Average Rate = $1,650; Average Rate with SR-22 = $3,120
  • Delaware – Average Rate = $1,850; Average Rate with SR-22 = $3,530
  • D.C. – Average Rate = $1,900; Average Rate with SR-22 = $3,000
  • Florida – Average Rate = $1,230; Average Rate with SR-22 = $3,800
  • Georgia – Average Rate = $1,800; Average Rate with SR-22 = $3,400
  • Hawaii – Average Rate = $1,300; Average Rate with SR-22 = $4,500
  • Idaho – Average Rate = $1,050; Average Rate with SR-22 = $1,800
  • Illinois – Average Rate = $1,300; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,200
  • Indiana – Average Rate = $1,180; Average Rate with SR-22 = $1,570
  • Iowa – Average Rate = $1,050; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,000
  • Kansas – Average Rate = $1,400; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,300
  • Kentucky – Average Rate = $1,600; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,720
  • Louisiana – Average Rate = $2,300; Average Rate with SR-22 = $3,600
  • Maine – Average Rate = $850; Average Rate with SR-22 = $1,340
  • Maryland – Average Rate = $1,550; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,000
  • Massachusetts – Average Rate = $1,250; Average Rate with SR-22 = $3,200
  • Michigan – Average Rate = $2,600; Average Rate with SR-22 = $8,300
  • Minnesota – Average Rate = $1,380; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,600
  • Mississippi – Average Rate = $1,400; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,600
  • Missouri – Average Rate = $1,280; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,300
  • Montana – Average Rate = $1,600; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,750
  • Nebraska – Average Rate = $1,300; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,700
  • Nevada – Average Rate = $1,550; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,500
  • New Hampshire – Average Rate = $1,100; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,000
  • New Jersey – Average Rate = $1,520; Average Rate with SR-22 = $3,900
  • New Mexico – Average Rate = $1,400; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,700
  • New York – Average Rate = $1,800; Average Rate with SR-22 = $1,850
  • North Carolina – Average Rate = $1,100; Average Rate with SR-22 = $5,500
  • North Dakota – Average Rate = $1,170; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,000
  • Ohio – Average Rate = $1,180; Average Rate with SR-22 = $1,700
  • Oklahoma – Average Rate = $2,000; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,200
  • Oregon – Average Rate = $1,300; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,300
  • Pennsylvania – Average Rate = $1,200; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,300
  • Rhode Island – Average Rate = $1,850; Average Rate with SR-22 = $3,650
  • South Carolina – Average Rate = $1,440; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,400
  • South Dakota – Average Rate = $1,270; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,250
  • Tennessee – Average Rate = $1,300; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,400
  • Texas – Average Rate = $1,800; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,700
  • Utah – Average Rate = $1,200; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,000
  • Vermont – Average Rate = $1,100; Average Rate with SR-22 = $1,800
  • Virginia – Average Rate = $1,070; Average Rate with SR-22 = $1,700
  • Washington – Average Rate = $1,400; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,200
  • West Virginia – Average Rate = $1,480; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,800
  • Wisconsin – Average Rate = $950; Average Rate with SR-22 = $1,800
  • Wyoming – Average Rate = $1,600; Average Rate with SR-22 = $2,800

What Insurance Companies File SR-22 Forms?

Most insurance providers will file SR-22 forms, including big names like Allstate, State Farm, Geico, Progressive, Nationwide, and Farmers.

You can expect to pay a little more because of this requirement, especially if your driving record has been tarnished, but you can still secure some discounts.

What is a Non-Owner SR-22?

If you don’t own a car or have access to a car for regular use (such as if someone in your household gives you a vehicle for everyday use) you will need to file for a non-owner SR-22. The rules are the same, but it applies to individuals that don’t own cars.

Bottom Line: Affordable Auto Insurance Policy

Just because you have SR-22 requirements doesn’t mean you have to accept the first offer you receive. You should still compare insurance quotes, speak with insurance agents, and do all you can to bring those insurance premiums down.

If you need more information, take a look at our many other guides on car insurance. We have extensive guides covering everything from insurance requirements based on your state and status, to guides on getting the cheapest car insurance policies as a young driver, senior driver, and more.