How Marital Status Affects Auto Insurance Rates

Your age and gender have a massive impact on your car insurance premiums and pay much more as a 16-year-old than a 30-year-old.

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The simple fact is, younger drivers and male drivers are more likely to be involved in a car accident, which means they need to pay higher auto insurance rates to cover the additional liability.

But age and gender aren’t the only things that insurers consider. Believe it or not, your marital status also impacts your rates, and in some states, the impact can be substantial.

Why Do Married Couples Pay Less?

Married couples pay less for their car insurance because the risk drops significantly once they tie the knot. As an example, studies have shown that married men are more responsible behind the wheel and are also more focused on their health.

The differences are less pronounced for women, but they are considered to be a smaller risk anyway and can get lower rates than men whether they are married or not.

How Marital Status Impacts Car Insurance Rates in Each State

Generally speaking, a married policyholder will save between 6% and 15%  when compared to a single policyholder. This isn’t true for all states but you can see our research below to get an idea of the differences in your state.

What follows is a list of averages spanning the average minimum and full coverage policy costs, along with the amounts that can be saved by married drivers.

  • Alabama – Full Cost = $1,400 and Minimum Cost = $550; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $85 to $225
  • Alaska – Full Cost = $1,200 and Minimum Cost = $450; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $65 to $170
  • Arizona – Full Cost = $1,400 and Minimum Cost = $600; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $90 to $210
  • Arkansas – Full Cost = $1,450 and Minimum Cost = $550; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $65 to $175
  • California – Full Cost = $1,650 and Minimum Cost = $650; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $65 to $165
  • Colorado – Full Cost = $1,600 and Minimum Cost = $650; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $65 to $160
  • Connecticut – Full Cost = $1,700 and Minimum Cost = $850; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $95 to $180
  • Delaware – Full Cost = $1,550 and Minimum Cost = $850; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $70 to $140
  • D.C. – Full Cost = $1,550 and Minimum Cost = $750; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $80 to $165
  • Florida – Full Cost = $2,350 and Minimum Cost = $1,100; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $50 to $110
  • Georgia – Full Cost = $1,600; Minimum Cost = $700; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $105 to $250
  • Hawaii – Full Cost = $1,200 and Minimum Cost = $500; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = No Discounts Found
  • Idaho – Full Cost = $950 and Minimum Cost = $350; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $45 to $110
  • Illinois – Full Cost = $1,150 and Minimum Cost = $450; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $65 to $160
  • Indiana – Full Cost = $1,000 and Minimum Cost = $400; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $40 to $100
  • Iowa – Full Cost = $1,000 and Minimum Cost = $300; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $35 to $110
  • Kansas – Full Cost = $1,300 and Minimum Cost = $450; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $45 to $130
  • Kentucky – Full Cost = $2,150 and Minimum Cost = $1,000; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $150 to $300
  • Louisiana – Full Cost = $3,000 and Minimum Cost = $1,150; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $110 to $300
  • Maine – Full Cost = $900 and Minimum Cost = $350; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $50 to $145
  • Maryland – Full Cost = $1,600 and Minimum Cost = $800; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $120 to $240
  • Massachusetts – Full Cost = $1,300 and Minimum Cost = $550; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = No Discounts Found
  • Michigan – Full Cost = $2,300 and Minimum Cost = $1,300; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $10 to $30
  • Minnesota – Full Cost = $1,300 and Minimum Cost = $550; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $70 to $180
  • Mississippi – Full Cost = $1,400 and Minimum Cost = $500; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $75 to $210
  • Missouri – Full Cost = $1,300 and Minimum Cost = $500; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $70 to $200
  • Montana – Full Cost = $1,250 and Minimum Cost = $400; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = No Discounts Found
  • Nebraska – Full Cost = $1,200 and Minimum Cost = $400; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $40 to $120
  • Nevada – Full Cost = $1,900 and Minimum Cost = $900; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $100 to $210
  • New Hampshire – Full Cost = $1,050 and Minimum Cost = $400; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $75 to $200
  • New Jersey – Full Cost = $1,800 and Minimum Cost = $1,000; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $120 to $200
  • New Mexico – Full Cost = $1,250 and Minimum Cost = $500; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $80 to $190
  • New York – Full Cost = $2,000 and Minimum Cost = $1,000; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $120 to $250
  • North Carolina – Full Cost = $1,100 and Minimum Cost = $400; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = No Discounts Found
  • North Dakota – Full Cost = $1,250 and Minimum Cost = $400; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $60 to $180
  • Ohio – Full Cost = $1,050 and Minimum Cost = $450; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $65 to $150
  • Oklahoma – Full Cost = $1,600; and Minimum Cost = $600; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $60 to $160
  • Oregon – Full Cost = $1,250 and Minimum Cost = $650; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $75 to $140
  • Pennsylvania – Full Cost = $1,150 and Minimum Cost = $400; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $50 to $130
  • Rhode Island – Full Cost = $1,700 and Minimum Cost = $800; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $120 to $250
  • South Carolina – Full Cost = $1,450 and Minimum Cost = $650; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $70 to $200
  • South Dakota – Full Cost = $1,200 and Minimum Cost = $300; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $35 to $140
  • Tennessee – Full Cost = $1,200 and Minimum Cost = $400; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $50 to $140
  • Texas – Full Cost = $1,500 and Minimum Cost = $650; Potential Saving for Married Applicants =  $40 to $120
  • Utah – Full Cost = $1,250; Minimum Cost = $600; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $90 to $180
  • Vermont – Full Cost = $1,000 and Minimum Cost = $300; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $50 to $250
  • Virginia – Full Cost = $1,000 and Minimum Cost = $400; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $60 to $150
  • Washington – Full Cost = $1,250 and Minimum Cost = $650; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $75 to $140
  • West Virginia – Full Cost = $1,300 and Minimum Cost = $500; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $75 to $160
  • Wisconsin – Full Cost = $1,000 and Minimum Cost = $350; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $45 to $130
  • Wyoming – Full Cost = $1,200 and Minimum Cost = $350; Potential Saving for Married Applicants = $35 to $120

Married vs Divorced and Widowed

Married people pay more than single people because they make fewer claims and are more likely to maintain a good driving record. But what about divorced, widowed, and separated drivers?

We compared rates by several major providers, including State Farm, GEICO, and Allstate, and found that while the cheapest rates were offered to married drivers, the most expensive were offered to drivers who had separated.

In fact, separated drivers were quoted more than single drivers, while drivers with domestic partners were quoted roughly the same as single drivers.

We also found that divorced applicants were quoted much more favorable auto insurance premiums, on average, than widowed ones.

Bottom Line: Marriage Discounts and Other Discounts

Whether you’re applying for home insurance, car insurance or life insurance, you’ll go up against underwriters that have a wealth of data at their disposal. They compare this data to your personal information to determine your risk and, in turn, the likelihood of a payout.

By reducing your risk and becoming a safer driver, you become more of an appealing prospect to the insurer and will be quoted lower rates as a result. Obviously, you shouldn’t go out and get married just so you can save a few bucks on your policy, but you can look into other discounts, the bulk of which are easier to acquire, including:

  • Multi-Car Discount: Available to policyholders who add more than one car to their policy and offered by most auto insurers.
  • Multi-Policy Discount: Available to applicants who purchase additional insurance products from the same provider. The most common bundling discounts are offered for car insurance and home insurance.
  • Good Student Discount: Maintain at least a B average and most insurance providers will give you a small discount.
  • Good Driving History: The more driving experience you have and the fewer accidents there are in your past, the lower your rates will be. The difference between a poor driving record and a good driving record can be huge.

And that’s not all, as there are other ways you can save on your car insurance policy. For instance, many providers will check your credit score and reward you with reduced rates if you have a high score. Your homeowner status can also help, as can membership to certain organizations (AAA, AARP). The type of car you drive is also considered and is one of the most important factors in determining your rates.

Keep all these things in mind the next time you apply for car insurance.