Average Car Insurance Rates (State by State)

The average cost of car insurance in the United States is between $1,400 and $1,500, and we arrive at this figure by calculating state minimum rates from all the biggest providers (Allstate, Progressive, State Farm, Geico, Nationwide). But depending on where you live, you could spend closer to $2,600 or less than $1,000—a massive difference.

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In this guide, we’ll look at the cheapest and most expensive states, giving you an idea of what you can expect to pay in your area.

Average Car Insurance Rates by State

What follows is the average cost of car insurance for all states. This information has been rounded down or up based on the most recent average auto insurance quotes. 

We have also included the number of fatal crashes and deaths, as well as the ratio of these to every 100,000 members of the population. This will give you an idea of why the quoted car insurance costs are what they are.

  • Alabama = $1,300. 876 fatal crashes; 953 deaths (19.5 per 100,000).
  • Alaska = $1,200. 69 fatal crashes; 80 deaths (10.8 per 100,000).
  • Arizona = $1,450. 916 fatal crashes; 1,010 deaths (14.1 per 100,000).
  • Arkansas = $1,550. 472 fatal crashes; 516 deaths (17.1 per 100,000).
  • California = $1,850. 3,259 fatal crashes; 3,563 deaths (9.0 per 100,000).
  • Colorado = $1,780. 588 fatal crashes; 632 deaths (11.1 per 100,000).
  • Connecticut = $1,650. 276 fatal crashes; 294 deaths (8.2 per 100,000).
  • Delaware = $1,850. 104 fatal crashes; 111 deaths (11.5 per 100,000).
  • D.C. = $1,900. 30 fatal crashes; 31 deaths (4.4 per 100,000).
  • Florida = $1,230. 2,915 fatal crashes; 3,133 deaths (14.7 per 100,000).
  • Georgia = $1,800. 1,407 fatal crashes; 1,504 deaths (14.3 per 100,000).
  • Hawaii = $1,300. 110 fatal crashes; 117 deaths (8.2 per 100,000).
  • Idaho = $1,050. 212 fatal crashes; 231 deaths (13.2 per 100,000).
  • Illinois = $1,300. 948 fatal crashes; 1,031 deaths (8.1 per 100,000).
  • Indiana = $1,180. 774 fatal crashes; 858 deaths (12.8 per 100,000).
  • Iowa = $1,050. 291 fatal crashes; 318 deaths (10.1 per 100,000).
  • Kansas = $1,400. 366 fatal crashes; 404 deaths (13.9 per 100,000).
  • Kentucky = $1,600. 664 fatal crashes; 724 deaths (16.2 per 100,000).
  • Louisiana = $2,300. 716 fatal crashes; 768 deaths (16.5 per 100,000).
  • Maine = $850. 128 fatal crashes; 137 deaths (10.2 per 100,000).
  • Maryland = $1,550. 474 fatal crashes; 501 deaths (8.3 per 100,000).
  • Massachusetts = $1,250. 343 fatal crashes; 360 deaths (5.2 per 100,000).
  • Michigan = $2,600. 905 fatal crashes; 974 deaths (9.7 per 100,000).
  • Minnesota = $1,380. 349 fatal crashes; 381 deaths (6.8 per 100,000).
  • Mississippi = $1,400. 597 fatal crashes; 664 deaths (22.2 per 100,000).
  • Missouri = $1,280. 848 fatal crashes; 921 deaths (15.0 per 100,000).
  • Montana = $1,600. 168 fatal crashes; 182 deaths (17.1 per 100,000).
  • Nebraska = $1,300. 201 fatal crashes; 230 deaths (11.9 per 100,000).
  • Nevada = $1,550. 300 fatal crashes; 330 deaths (10.9 per 100,000).
  • New Hampshire = $1,100. 134 fatal crashes; 147 deaths (10.8 per 100,000).
  • New Jersey = $1,520. 525 fatal crashes; 564 deaths (6.3 per 100,000).
  • New Mexico = $1,400. 350 fatal crashes; 391 deaths (18.7 per 100,000).
  • New York = $1,800. 889 fatal crashes; 943 deaths (4.8 per 100,000).
  • North Carolina = $1,100. 1,321 fatal crashes; 1,437 deaths (13.8 per 100,000).
  • North Dakota = $1,170. 95 fatal crashes; 105 deaths (13.8 per 100,000).
  • Ohio = $1,180. 996 fatal crashes; 1,068 deaths (9.1 per 100,000).
  • Oklahoma = $2,000. 603 fatal crashes; 655 deaths (16.6 per 100,000).
  • Oregon = $1,300. 450 fatal crashes; 506 deaths (12.1 per 100,000).
  • Pennsylvania = $1,200. 1,103 fatal crashes; 1,190 deaths (9.3 per 100,000).
  • Rhode Island = $1,850. 56 fatal crashes; 59 deaths (5.6 per 100,000).
  • South Carolina = $1,440. 970 fatal crashes; 1,037 deaths (20.4 per 100,000).
  • South Dakota = $1,270. 110 fatal crashes; 130 deaths (14.7 per 100,000).
  • Tennessee = $1,300. 974 fatal crashes; 1,041 deaths (15.4 per 100,000).
  • Texas = $1,800. 3,305 fatal crashes; 3,642 deaths (12.7 per 100,000).
  • Utah = $1,200. 237 fatal crashes; 260 deaths (8.2 per 100,000).
  • Vermont = $1,100. 60 fatal crashes; 68 deaths (10.9 per 100,000).
  • Virginia = $1,070. 778 fatal crashes; 820 deaths (9.6 per 100,000).
  • Washington = $1,400. 497 fatal crashes; 546 deaths (7.2 per 100,000).
  • West Virginia = $1,480. 265 fatal crashes; 294 deaths (16.3 per 100,000).
  • Wisconsin = $950. 530 fatal crashes; 588 deaths (10.1 per 100,000).
  • Wyoming = $1,600. 100 fatal crashes; 111 deaths (19.2 per 100,000).

What do Car Insurance Companies Consider?

Car insurance companies will consider many different things when setting your rates. Some of these can be altered to improve your position and secure cheaper rates, others cannot. The following things will be considered when determining your auto insurance rates.

1. Your Location

As you can see from the list above, where you live has a massive impact on how high or low your insurance premiums will be. 

Underwriters will check to see whether you live in a rural area or a built-up area, as drivers in highly-congested areas are more likely to be in a car accident due to the greater number of cars on the road. They will also look at how many car accidents, collisions, and car thefts have occurred in your area.

It seems a little unfair to suggest that you could be paying more just because there are more criminals and crashes in your area. It essentially means you’re paying for other peoples’ mistakes. But insurance is all about liability and if you’re in a high-crime and high-crash area, you’re a huge liability.

It’s worth noting, however, that your location isn’t always weighted the same. In some states, including California, authorities require underwriters to consider many other factors before they factor your location into the equation.

2. Demographic

Younger drivers are more likely to be involved in a car accident and to make a claim, which is why they can be quoted two to three times more than someone 5 or 10 years older. Your gender also plays a role, as men are more likely to be in an accident than women.

Age and gender actually account for more than your location and if you’re a new, 16-year-old driver, there isn’t much you can do to avoid extortionate insurance rates.

3. Driving Record

Your driving history plays a huge role. If you have speeding tickets, parking fines, and have been involved in at least one at-fault accident, you’ll likely see a sharp rise in your car insurance quote. Insurers will see you as a liability, and this is true for young drivers and older drivers.

4. Living Status 

As alluded to above, insurance is about risk and liability. Auto insurance companies  use statistics to determine how likely you are to make a claim based on other people in your situation.

It’s easy to understand why young males are considerably more likely to claim than older females, just as it’s easy to understand why someone who has a major violation (such as a DUI) is more likely to claim than someone without.

But one of the quirks of car insurance is that discounts are also offered for married drivers vs non-married drivers and for homeowners vs renters. They are deemed more responsible and statistically speaking, they are also less likely to make a claim. 

And we’re not talking about a slight difference, either. A recent study found that single drivers were twice as likely to be involved in an accident than married drivers.

5. Credit Score

Insurers prefer drivers with good credit, as they are less likely to make a claim. If you have bad credit, you could be quoted up to $1,000 more than someone with excellent credit, although the average rate is much less, and bad credit won’t prevent you from getting the insurance coverage you need.

6. Type of Vehicle

Collision coverage is likely to be much higher for a sports car built from expensive and rare parts than a commercial SUV. Not only will the former cost more to repair, but the latter is also more likely to be fitted with anti-theft features and safety features. The right car could save you hundreds of dollars on your car insurance.

In addition to repair costs, your insurer will also look at the theft rate and accident rate for that vehicle. If it’s a big target for local thieves, your car insurance premiums will increase.

7. Usage

The less you use the car, the less cover you need and the cheaper your premiums will be. The insurance company will ask about your daily commute, how much you use the car, and where your daily travel takes you. The lower your mileage is, and the less hazardous your journey, the less you can expect to pay every month.

Insurance Policy Discounts and Reductions

As discussed above, your location is only one part of the puzzle, and while it is an important one, an insurer will take many other things into consideration. On top of state minimum cover, you also have to think about personal injury protection, uninsured motorist cover, comprehensive coverage, and more.

This can drive insurance prices higher and lay your monthly budget to waste, but there are a few ways you can bring those costs down:

  • Work on improving your credit score.
  • Compare as many free insurance quotes as you can.
  • Be careful when selecting full coverage and choose only what you need.
  • Tweak the deductibles to suit your budget and your car. Higher deductibles mean a lower fee, but a greater cost if you are involved in an accident.
  • Look into good grade discounts if you are a student and senior discounts if you are a senior.
  • Members of the military can save up to 90% on their insurance premiums.
  • Offer to pay your premiums upfront to make a small saving.
  • Keep your driving record clean.
  • Change your insurance after every major life event, such as getting married or becoming a homeowner.
  • Use bundling (whereby you purchase multiple policies from the same provider) to save.
  • Speak with your insurance agent to get the best discounts.
  • Be careful when purchasing your car.